How To Develop and Deliver a Elevator Pitch For Your Brand.


Ever run into a potential client or new connections, and when they ask what you do your mind goes completely blank? Or maybe you could happily talk about what you do all day. But can’t figure out how to about squeeze all that good stuff into a minute-long pitch? Not so easy- right?


I wrote this post because I see many business owners making crucial mistakes when given the opportunity to share about their business. By now everyone knows what a elevator pitch is, they either just don’t have one, or their pitch doesn’t really work in a real-life situation. Why? Because in reality, it’s not always appropriate to spend a whole minute introducing yourself. ( Yes in 2020 even a minute can feel like a hour to some people)


So we’ll divide them up into 10-sec, 30-sec, and 60-sec pitches (with the aim for using as little of that time as possible) Each pitch can be used in different scenarios that’ll help you present your business confidently in any situation and you'll be sure to not waste time or miss any opportunity that comes your way!

By the time we are done you’ll be able to deliver  an elevator pitch that is:

+Brief

+Clear

+Simple to understand

+Has a singular focus

+Shows how you add value

With each interaction, the goal is not just to make a good impression, but the right impression. This goes for whether you’re just introducing yourself to someone new or giving a short presentation. You want the other person to come away having a true understanding of what you do and how you can (potentially) make their life better.


Before we dive in, here’s a breakdown of the information you will be using:


Your Name, Your Brand, & Your Job Description

Ok, your name and brand name are the obvious part. For your job description (by definition) should describe what you do, rather than just giving a job title that is vague. So, don’t say that you’re a business owner, or a CEO, or a Whatever-made-up-name-you-give-yourself. Instead come up with a one-to-two-word job description, even if it’s not your official title.


Don’t be too cute with it because it will just be just too confusing. – Like this copywriter, I know who use to say “My name is Jess, and I’m a storyteller.” People would then ask him; “So you read books to little kids for a living? He needed to be more descriptive. Now he says. “My name is Jess, and I'm a Direct Response Copywriter and Content Marketer.


Your Target Customer

Because you have a brand strategy, then you already have a well-defined target customer, you should include it in your elevator pitch. When you say, “I work with small business owners”, or “I work with corporate leaders”, or “I offer a product for pet owners”, you are making a connection in the other person’s brain. If they identify with that demographic you described, their ears are going to perk up to listen to what you have to say. And even if they don’t personally identify with it, they may start thinking of someone they know who uses your service or product.

Pain Points

Your mission statement already answered the question: “Why do you exist?” so you already know the pain point that only your service/product will help solve and therefore, your elevator pitch should include it too.

Describe the way you or your service assists in solving that pain point and the end result for your target customer and how their life is better because they used your solution.


Your Free Offering

This is your Call-to-Action (CTA) moment. Your website and your social media posts have CTAs, so why shouldn’t your elevator pitch? If you have the time to do so, it makes sense for you to present an action step for the listener(s) to take. I would strongly recommend that you make it some sort of free offer to rope them.

This could be a free Branded PDF, eBook or consultation, a sample of your product, or whatever works best for your industry. Provide this in exchange for their contact info (preferably their email). If you are presenting to a group of people, then this incentivizes them to come and talk to you after.

Ready, Set, Go....


10 Second Pitch

When to use it: The 10-Second Pitch is very short.  You will probably use this one the most because it is meant for brief individual introductions. This is the pitch you share at the bar, at the gym, or anywhere really.

Hi, my name is [Your Name] with [Your Brand], and I’m a [Your Job Description]

The purpose of this short pitch is to provide a clear and succinct answer to the inevitable question, “So, what do you do?” The reason it needs to be clear is it may be the only few words you get to share about what you do before the conversation takes a different turn. And if that person happens to need what you offer, you want to make sure you clearly present yourself as their solution.



30 Second Pitch

When to use it:  This one is for similar situations when you’re a bit more time to talk. For Services:

… Basically, I/we work with [Target Customer] who [the Problem Your Customer Has Before You Work with Them], and I [What You Do] in order to [How You Make Their Life Better as a Result].

For Products:

I/we offer a product for [Target Customer] who [the Problem Your Customer Has Before They Use the Product], and it [What the Product Does] in order to [How It Makes Their Life Better as a Result].


60 Second Pitch

When to use it:  When you have a minute or longer to introduce yourself. For example; when you’re at a networking group. Most will give each attendee a chance to tell the group what they do. This pitch will give you the added confidence you may need - just to attend one. 

I/we work with [Target Customer] who [the Problem Your Customer Has Before You Work with Them], and I [What You Do] in order to [How You Make Their Life Better as a Result].
I wanted to let you know that right now I’m offering [Your Free Offering]. If you or someone you know could benefit from this, I would love to talk to you more about that.

To give you a real-world example here is my elevator pitch using the 60-Second Pitch for my design retainer services.


I am a Brand Strategist | Designer. I create marketing solutions for successful small business owners that are struggling to reflect that success in their visual brand, and I offer affordable retainer pages so that their digital and print marketing collateral is attractive and effective. Right now I’m offering free marketing audits. Here are a few business cards, so you can take a look at what II have done for others and if you or someone you know can benefit from that give me a call.

This works best for service-based businesses, but with just a few alterations to section two, it also works for representing products:


For Products:

I/we offer a product for [Target Customer] who [the Problem Your Customer Has Before They Use the Product], and it [What the Product Does] in order to [How It Makes Their Life Better as a Result] I wanted to let you know that right now we are offering [Your Free Offering]. If you or someone you know could benefit from this, I get some contact info so I can send it to you or them.


The End Result


Depending on your situation, you may want to alter your 10-Second Pitch if you are targeting different clients for different services. Just think through it – you’ll figure out what you need.


Conclusion

Now you should be equipped to create a clear, concise elevator pitch. Now you just need to actually write it out and memorize it. If you have employees, you need to make them memorize it too since they represent your brand.

Once you’re done, comment below with the elevator pitch you came up with! I look forward to reading it.


#ElevatorPitchForYourBrand #marketingyoursmallbiz

8 views

WHERE TO START

It all starts 
with a chat…

917.674.1025

WHERE TO FIND ME

I'm currently located in South Flordia, however, 90% of my clients are in different states, so I am happy to work with you wherever you are.

QUICK LINKS

  • LinkedIn - Grey Circle
  • Facebook
  • Instagram

Helene Abrams | consider yourself BRANDED |  2020 All rights reserved.